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Tag: WINDOW MANAGER

GNOME 3 released, ushers in an interesting amalgam of iOS and OS X

GNOME 3, after more than two years of development, has been released into the wild. GNOME 3 is not merely the logical successor of GNOME 2: it is an entirely new project, started from scratch, to create a "completely new, modern desktop designed for today's users and technologies." The best way to check out GNOME 3's new features -- and it has lots of new features -- is to run a live version...

With Ubuntu's shift to Qt in 11.10, an attack on the mobile sector must be imminent

Qt, come the end of 2011, is to become a standard component of Ubuntu 11.10. Ubuntu currently, and in the upcoming 11.04 Natty Narwhal distribution, uses Gtk+, a competing toolkit maintained by the GNOME Foundation. When Canonical announced Ubuntu's shift away from the GNOME desktop manager in 11.04, the switch to Qt was almost a foregone conclusion; GNOME requires Gtk+, but Unity doesn't --...

GNOME 3 website now live, tries a bit too hard to be cool, looks like Unity

New, clean-and-simple HTML5 websites are obviously in this week: GNOME, one of the most popular desktop environments for Linux, has just released a new website to celebrate the features of version 3, which will be released in April. With phrases like "SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL" and "DISTRACTION-FREE COMPUTING" plastered all over the site it's obvious that GNOME not only likes capital letters, but that...

Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal will ship with 2D version of Unity for older and weaker computers

It's amazing it took this long for Canonical to confirm, but it seems that Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal will ship with both a fancy, OpenGL-accelerated version of Unity, and a flatter, slightly more sedate 2D version for older, unaccelerated hardware. A couple more images of the 2D UI are available after the break. Given the fact that one of the most common targets for Linux installations is on...

Ubuntu devs discuss the change from GNOME Shell to Unity in Natty 11.04 (video)

One of the biggest changes in the upcoming release of Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal is a change away from much-loved GNOME Shell to Canonical's Unity. Such a big change has garnered a lot of commentary on both sides of the fence, but the truth is, you'll be able to switch back to Shell if you don't like Unity! Still, if you're interested in hearing the reasoning behind the change to Unity, you...

SecondShell is a portable utility that makes Windows Explorer a lot more user friendly

SecondShell is a tool that makes window management both less fiddly and more keyboard shortcut oriented. It doesn't actually do a whole lot (it's only 200 kilobytes!), but it adds such handy features that you'll wonder why Windows doesn't include them by default. First, you can resize windows by holding down Alt+Right click and dragging the mouse anywhere in the window. Alt+Left click moves...

Dexpot is an awesome virtual desktop app - now with Windows 7 superbar integration!

Virtual desktops have long been one of those things that Linux has held over Windows (and Mac too, until recently). They're one of those things that you can't quite see the point of -- until you use them. You're then left wondering how you ever lived without them: alt-tab is for chumps! Why minimize windows when you can minimize your DESKTOP? Enter Dexpot, undoubtedly the best virtual desktop...

Scalable Fabric Gives Your Windows Some Perspective

If you've got a mammoth widescreen monitor on your desk and you're a Windows user, you may be wondering what to do with all the extra real estate you've got. Why not use it to visually manage your running applications? Microsoft Scalable Fabric takes your monitor periphery and turns it into a tumbnail gallery of your non-active windows. After installing the app (which requires the .Net 1.1...

Flipping the Linux switch: Enlightening experiences with window managers

Do you remember our youth? The good times we had, the games we played, and that great discussion we had about what makes a window manager different from a desktop environment? Then our relationship sort of got stuck on desktop environments. It's understandable, of course. Most new Linux users feel more comfortable with something a little heavier than a window manager like Fluxbox or WindowMaker....