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Tag: GAWKER

The best (or worst) security breaches of 2010

Very soon now -- probably in a year or two -- once everyone carries a smartphone, there won't be any discernible difference between our offline flesh-and-blood body and our online persona. That's not to say that real-life face-to-face interaction will slither into the abyss -- far from it! -- but we are reaching a stage where almost anything can be done online. This obviously raises security...

Google search now warns you of hacked and compromised sites

Emerging just a week after the high-profile Gawker Media hack, and proving it is still very fleet-footed indeed, Google search results now warn you if a website has been hacked. The notification (see screenshot above) looks just like the malware warning. Unlike the malware warning, however, you do not get shown the ominous 'visiting this site may harm your computer!' interstitial page. Rather,...

LinkedIn shows technical savvy, deactivates Gawker-compromised accounts

It looks like at least one security team has their finger on the pulse: LinkedIn, after hearing about the Gawker Media hack, obtained the database of email addresses and cross-checked it against every member of LinkedIn. If a match was found, the account was immediately deactivated and an email sent to the user, forcing them to change their password. Judging by a thread over at Hacker News,...

News flash: everything on the Internet is hackable

This weekend, Gawker Media had its primary database compromised. In this monstrous breach, not only did 1.5 million users have their privacy breached and email address stolen, but they also had their passwords cracked. In a day and age where the currency of our email address and password -- and thus our identity -- is only superseded by our bank details, it's fair to label the Gawker breach as...

Gawker hack leads to Twitter acai spam

It's bad enough that a database of 1.3 million user passwords from Gawker Media sites was hacked and posted online over the weekend, but it gets worse. It turns out that many of those users didn't set unique passwords for all their online accounts. Now, a large number of Twitter accounts have been compromised and used to spam bogus links about acai berries. The acai spam attack was so large...

Three password apps to protect yourself from trouble like the Gawker database hack

Sure, it's fun to post comments on websites and converse with your fellow readers, but there's always a little danger involved. Why? Because sometimes the sites where you post those comments rile up the wrong people and wind up with a big security breach -- like the one at Gawker. One of the biggest lessons to be learned from the Gawker fiasco is this: don't use the same password everywhere. ...

Gawker Media hacked, 1.5 million usernames stolen, CMS breached

Gawker Media, the company behind Lifehacker, Gizmodo, and several other major blogs, has been hacked. This has been an ongoing story for a couple of days now. At first it seemed only the user database had been compromised, but as further details emerged, it became evident Gawker's content management system had also been breached. A group going by the name 'Gnosis' appears to be taking credit for...

Gawk all day and all night long

Gawker lets you do time-lapse photography with your Mac's iSight. You can share and record your streams with other people, and they can record as well. That's awesome. And very scary. Don't forget to turn it off before you go to bed, or the world wide interwebs will know that you sing Barry Manilow in your sleep. It was just one time, ok? There's a neat page of examples that you can check out...

Valleywag: Silicon Valley gossip rag

And now for something a little different: Valleywag is a new blog from Gawker (the people who make Lifehacker, to name just one) that's "a tech gossip rag focusing mainly on the people and stories of San Francisco and Silicon Valley." In more practical terms, it's The Superficial for geeks. Yeah, I was skeptical, too, but it's pretty good stuff if you enjoy gossip for gossip's sake but...

Kinja gets a makeover

Kinja, the web-based RSS reader and brainchild of Gawker founder Nick Denton and former Blogger developer Meg Hourihan got a pretty significant makeover last week. Its innaugural post on official Kinja blog reads, "After significant upgrades to... welll... everything, kinja is back online. ... We feel this is a much better kinja and it will continue to improve." Kinja's category pages...