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Tag: AACS

Slysoft promises AnyDVD will crack future HD-DVD/Blu-Ray discs

There's a cat and mouse game that goes on between those who produce professional videos and those who want to watch those videos on their own terms. Every time the folks behind DVDs, Blu-Ray discs, or HD-DVDs serve up a new DRM scheme, hackers go to work trying to figure out how to circumvent that encryption. You can look at this as a noble or malicious act: either the hackers want to make sure...

The funny story of the latest AACS key leak

Boing Boing reports a story that will go down in the book of hacker lore about the leak of the latest AACS key. It seems that weeks before the latest leaked key began to make the rounds on the Doom 9 forums, it was first released in an inauspicious and sly way which, for geeks like us, is actually kind of funny. Ed Felton of Freedom To Tinker satirized the idea of "protecting" a number with his...

HD-DVD key numbers turned into colors on a T-shirt

You know those numbers that could change the world? No, not the ones on Lost, the HD-DVD key code that could lead to the end of Digg as we know it. Well, the sixteen hexadecimal digits are just numbers when it comes right down to it. And you can do all sorts of things with numbers, like use them as a basis for web-colors and make them into a pretty picture that may or may not be illegal to share...

HD-DVD key fiasco is an example of 21st century digital revolt

It's the most circulated number of the week. Sixteen hexadecimal digits that unlock the wonder of most currently released HD-DVD titles from the surly clutches of the AACS revenue content protection system. Sixteen digits that have been posted in so many places -- and in many cases, removed only to be reposted -- that they're hard to avoid. Cory Doctorow's class blog for his USC course, "Pwned:...

First Blu-Ray/HD-DVD key revoked

And the saga continues. The content protection system used on next generation HD capable DVD's (AACS) was recently compromised through an exploit in the popular WinDVD software made by Intervideo. In a departure from the standard definition DVD encryption spec (CSS), AACS allows for the publishers to revoke keys handed out to specific licensees, if those licensees somehow misbehave or compromise...

Surprise! MPAA not too happy about BackupHDDVD

Well, who would have seen that coming? Apparently the Motion Picture Association isn't particularly happy about BackupHDDVD, a tool developed by the hackers over at the doom9 forum that decrypts AACS encryption on HD DVDs. The MPAA sent a notice to SourceForge, asking them to take down all the files related to the program, and SourceForge complied. That's not to say that you can't find the files...

Microsoft Vista DRM subverted

Within the past month, both HD DVD and Blu-Ray's AACS protection scheme has been bypassed, and now news has broken of a researcher cracking Vista's DRM scheme. Mind you, Vista just barely hit the shelves. Boing Boing sums it up very nicely: "As with previous multi-year DRM development efforts, this one disintegrated like wet kleenex on contact with the general public. Now that Vista, HDCP, Blu-Ray...

First HD-DVD rip shows up online

Well, the controversy over whether BackupHDDVD actually does anything like, you know, ripping HD-DVD movies appears to be over. Several movie rips, including Serenity have already made their way to BitTorrent trackers. The breakthrough came when members of the Doom9 Forum tracked down several unique memory keys that BackupHDDVD needs in order to decrypt HD-DVDs. Apparently the keys for King Kong...