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RoyalKnight

Member since: Apr 10th, 2009

RoyalKnight's Latest Comments

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Download Squad16 Comments

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Google Chrome changes its logo... again! (pictures) (Download Squad)

Mar 27th 2011 12:56AM The old logo is still my favorite, as it seemed to symbolize a high-tech, futuristic engine for the web. For the new one, it seemed far too flat next to ALL of my other icons (even the Picasa one) and lacking dynamics in lighting, color tone, and perspective.

I'm never really much for something that screams Adobe Illustrator, vector graphics, and "have I told you I'm hip today" undertones in general, though, so I have a bit of a bias.

Google's Native Client updates to Pepper API, looks set to fragment the Web (Download Squad)

Feb 21st 2011 4:45PM Ahh yes, fragmentation.

Just like how more standards-compliant browsers like Opera and the then-new Firefox fragmented the web from the de facto standard of IE6.

Just like how IE fragmented itself from IE6 with IE7 and 8 to play catchup with the rest.

Just like how Chrome fragmented the web renderer market when it was first released, where suddenly we had to target for Trident, Gecko, and Webkit (and Presto, if you still remember Opera being there) who all had different levels of standards compliance.

Just like how the rise of smartphones and mobile browsing fragmented web design itself in sizes that can be summed up as "big wide screen" and "small long screen" (and anything else your demographics works with).

Just like how we're currently being fragmented with HTML5 capability ("Sorry, your browser doesn't support HTML5, upgrade to a bunch of browsers most of you have only heard of, no worries!"), H.264 vs WebM, Apple vs. both Adobe and proper standards.

...Really, "fragmentation" happens so much that NaCl doesn't really hold a candle to, say, Silverlight, which I'm barely bothered about. With how current trends are going and NaCl actually takes off, then everyone but Apple will go "Hey, nice idea, Google!" and develop their own compatible implementation. But we'll just have to see if this even becomes anything first.

Firefox 4, 5, 6 and 7 to be released before the end of 2011 (Download Squad)

Feb 7th 2011 8:10PM @SilverWave A lot easier than you might think. I myself "pride" myself on being able to crash anything within a day of normal use. Friends letting me use some of their new tech have had mixed reactions toward this.

On the flip side, I'd recommend to Aemony to just nuke her Chrome installation and information and reinstall from scratch, if they still want to use Chrome. If that doesn't work (and you're using a stable build), you can probably blame it on an extension.

Of course, if you're using a dev or nightly build, you're pretty much asking for a crash, especially if you're like me and like to do all sorts of shenanigans with the installation.

Firefox 4, 5, 6 and 7 to be released before the end of 2011 (Download Squad)

Feb 7th 2011 8:09PM @RoyalKnight ...and thank you, Opera, for screwing up my reply click.

Firefox 4, 5, 6 and 7 to be released before the end of 2011 (Download Squad)

Feb 7th 2011 8:08PM @SilverWave A lot easier than you might think. I myself "pride" myself on being able to crash anything within a day of normal use. Friends letting me use some of their new tech have had mixed reactions toward this.

On the flip side, I'd recommend to Aemony to just nuke her Chrome installation and information and reinstall from scratch, if they still want to use Chrome. If that doesn't work (and you're using a stable build), you can probably blame it on an extension.

Of course, if you're using a dev or nightly build, you're pretty much asking for a crash, especially if you're like me and like to do all sorts of shenanigans with the installation.

What are the first applications you install on a new computer? (Download Squad)

Feb 2nd 2011 12:21AM After patching and whatnot, these are the programs that I install in rapid succession before I really start using the computer (rough order).

* Opera
Firefox
Chrome
* Malwarebytes
SUPERAntiSpyware
* CCleaner
Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer
Microsoft Security Essentials
* Unlocker
Copy Path Shell Extension
Foxit Reader
* Notepad++
Microsoft Office
Q10
* 7-Zip
* mIRC
* Pidgin
Skype
Ventrilo
Paint.NET
CDisplay
* AIMP2
Media Player Classic HomeCinema
Visual Subst (and junction.exe from Winternals)
* SmartDefrag
* WinDirStat
uTorrent
* CDBurnerXP
* (A variety of video and audio codecs, filters, etc.)

* Denotes essentials

Google Tasks top 5 user-requested features announced (Download Squad)

Jan 14th 2011 11:02PM I've been hoping for Tasks synchronization and an API for god knows how long, as have scores of others on Google Groups. I guess it's nice that they're finally doing it, but... it seems awfully late. Late enough that the adage of "better late than never" doesn't seem very comforting anymore.

Five things average users will love about Internet Explorer 9 (Download Squad)

Sep 17th 2010 1:14AM Great guide, Lee! First time I've seen someone hit on the major features so neatly and in as few words as necessary.

Greg's Cable Map is a treasure trove of information about the Internet's layout (Download Squad)

Sep 13th 2010 5:29PM From what I remember reading about the topic, China and their Great Firewall has given rise to an environment that promotes Chinese services, Chinese infrastructure, and Chinese content (ignoring government censorship and approval right now for the sake of this argument). While it's not quite there yet, this points in the direction of a separate Chinese Internet that would still be usable by Chinese should China get cut off from the rest of the world (whether it be by their own decision or not).

Some person (that I forgot, since I read about this some time ago) made the prediction that other national entities might inevitably fall into that same pattern, for reasons that would include maintaining quality of service (bandwidth), safeguarding their physical network infrastructure (connectivity), or protection from countries that purposefully conduct cyber attacks on other nations (security).

There's a lot of cable trunk lines still going around, and if it came down to it, it's not particularly hard to physically sever the connections rid of them. Attacking the network infrastructure between, say, France and Germany in would be a lot harder, as it would physically be on European Union soil, as opposed to a five billion mile cable stretching across the middle of the ocean.

Greg's Cable Map is a treasure trove of information about the Internet's layout (Download Squad)

Sep 13th 2010 5:12PM Sometimes when I have discussions with people on Internet infrastructure, security, and overall Internet network load, they tend to forget the fact that the Internet has a very physical form (and that it physically costs money to plan, create, and maintain this infrastructure).

When cables or routers give out, connections get lost and rerouted, which causes severe network congestion more often than we'd like. (There was this one notable incident in the past that cut off a good portion of Asia from a direct connection to Europe... and the alternate routes were so badly congested that many people I knew that were affected just stopped trying to surf the Internet for a few days.)

It's sad that so many people still cling to the belief that the Internet is unlimited entity, and base their arguments on its extremes.